MILITARY OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES

 

MOS CODES ARE USEFUL IN IDENTIFYING HIGH-RISK MILITARY EXPOSURES

With over 500 military occupations across the five military branches, exposures may vary. We try to dive in here.

When we conducted our research, we wanted to identify certain jobs, extra duties and qualifications that would place veterans at a higher risk. One assumption was - "It is obvious that infantry veterans will be more routinely exposed to lead and sulfur", and that is true, however, what if you are not infantry and spend more time on the base or in a helicopter, medical tent, etc.

We wanted to determine the branch of service and military occupation to gain a better understanding of who was exposed and what were they exposed to. Below you'll find our demographics data.

 
 
newnew.jpg

The chart shows the rated exposure intensity (Low vs. High) for various toxins that cause airway irritation and respiratory distress; diesel exhausts, sandstorms, burn pits, combat dust (related to firefights, etc.) and VDGF. The second chart shows the percentage of combat verses noncombat military occupational specialties that have a high hazard as it relates to duration and proximity.

Image Credit: Zell-Baran et al., 2019 JOEM (61)12: 1036-1040.

 

Follow

Contact

202-599-6477

Address

306 Thayer Street #2694
Providence, RI 02906

© 2019 HunterSeven Foundation. All Rights Reserved.

Disclaimer: Communications between you and HunterSeven Foundation are protected by our Privacy Policy, and by the The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. HunterSeven provides access to independent medical studies and self-help services at your specific direction. Your access to the website is subject to our Terms of Use.